09 August 2019

March of Dimes

2018

Commitment Progress

In 2017-2018, the March of Dimes continued its prematurity prevention efforts and increased attention to reducing maternal mortality and morbidity in the U.S., particularly among women of color. March of Dimes focused on improving equity in birth outcomes for both mothers and babies by working in the following areas:
• Drive improvements in care: One key priority area was to continue to test and expand the March of Dimes model of group prenatal care called Supportive Pregnancy Care in the U.S. The pilot phase of this project has been completed, and expansion is underway in 11 states.

• US Advocacy: We conducted a powerful advocacy initiative called #BlanketChange to cultivate awareness of the increased rates of maternal mortality and preterm birth, and maternity care deserts across the U.S. #BlanketChange achieved nearly 20 million online impressions and increased the conversation around maternal mortality by 65 percent.
– We successfully lobbied US Congress for passage of the PREEMIE Reauthorization Act and the Preventing Maternal Deaths Act, two top priority pieces of legislation.
– We continued to highlight health equity and geographic and racial/ethnic disparities in preterm birth through the annual 2018 U.S. Premature Birth Report Card.

• Education and support. We reached about 10 million people worldwide through our educational resources in English and Spanish – including our website, blogs, social media and personalized information and support. In 2018, our NICU Family Support Program® offered information to thousands of families.

• Advancing Research: In 2018 we extended our network of Prematurity Research Centers (PRCs) to six by welcoming the Imperial College London as our first European center. on. We funded $10 million USD in research at the PRCs to find the unknown causes of premature birth and new ways to prevent and treat it.

• Global Advocacy: We mobilized thousands globally to participate in annual World Prematurity Day events (November 17), and led the collaboration of more than over 130 global partners, in advocacy, education and awareness efforts for World Birth Defects Day (March 3). Both days were supported by consumer and parent groups and millions were reached through social media and organizing local events worldwide.
– A Consensus Statement on Birth Defects in Latin America and the Caribbean was developed as a result of March of Dimes 2017 International Conference on Birth Defects and Disabilities in the Developing World (Bogota, Colombia). This statement was submitted to the Pan American Journal of Public Health for publication in 2019.

2017

Commitment Progress

In 2016-2017, the March of Dimes continued its prematurity prevention efforts, to reduce the preterm birth rate in the United States to 8.1 percent by 2020 and decrease the toll of death and disability from premature birth and birth defects worldwide.
We continued our work on eight evidence-based interventions to reduce preterm birth in the U.S., including birth spacing and pregnancy intentionality, low dose aspirin to prevent preeclampsia, smoking cessation, elimination of early elective deliveries, and group prenatal care, and pilot tested a Supportive Pregnancy Care program. We reached about 10 million people worldwide through our educational resources in English and Spanish – including our website, blogs, social media and personalized information and support. In 2017, our NICU Family Support Program® offered information and support to over 91,000 families with babies in over 100 NICUs.

We funded $10 million USD in research at five Prematurity Research Centers to find the unknown causes of premature birth and new ways to prevent and treat it.
We mobilized thousands globally to participate in annual World Prematurity Day events in November, including through the World Prematurity Network, comprised of consumer and parent groups that are leaders in addressing preterm birth in their countries. In 2016-2017, we continued to highlight health equity and geographic and racial/ethnic disparities in preterm birth through the annual U.S. Premature Birth Report Card.
In collaboration over 120 global partners, March of Dimes led the efforts for World Birth Defects Day on March 3 each year.  Also in 2017, March of Dimes sponsored and led the implementation of its 8th International Conference on Birth Defects and Disabilities in the Developing World, in Colombia. This conference was attended by more than 300 participants from 33 countries and a consensus statement on Prevention of Congenital Disorders and Care of Affected Children in Latin America is expected to be published shortly.

2015

The March of Dimes commits to the updated Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s, and Adolescents’ Health (2016-2030) through the following actions. March of Dimes commits to continuing its Prematurity Campaign through 2020, working to reduce the preterm birth rate in the United States to 8.1 per cent or less, and helping to build a global constituency to reduce the toll of death and disability caused by preterm birth worldwide. The March of Dimes Prematurity Campaign devotes approximately USD $20 million annually to: (1) fund biomedical research and trans-disciplinary research aimed at delineating the multi-factorial causes of premature birth; (2) collaborate with state governments, hospitals and lower-income country partners to enhance the quality and accessibility of preconception, prenatal, inter-conception and newborn care; (3) provide education and consumer awareness campaigns to promote health behaviours that reduce risk of prematurity, and 4) provide guidance and comfort to parents of premature babies.

March of Dimes commits to provide at least USD $60 million to support five trans-disciplinary research centres on premature birth at leading institutions in the United States. From 2014 – 2020, March of Dimes commits to continuing to lead World Prematurity Day, held annually on 17 November as an open platform for organizations to focus attention on premature birth as the leading cause of death of children under the age of five, and to advocate for further action on prevention.

Commitment Progress

In 2015-2016, the March of Dimes continued its Prematurity Campaign, to reduce the preterm birth rate in the United States to 8.1 percent by 2020 and decrease the toll of death and disability from premature birth and birth defects worldwide. We continued our work on eight evidence-based interventions to reduce preterm birth in the U.S., including birth spacing and pregnancy intentionality, low dose aspirin to prevent preeclampsia, smoking cessation, elimination of early elective deliveries, and group prenatal care, launching a Supportive Pregnancy Care program.

Our NICU Family Support Program® provided comfort and information to about 70,000 families with babies in 120 hospital NICUs. We funded $10 million USD in research at five Prematurity Research Centers to find the unknown causes of premature birth and new ways to prevent and treat it. We mobilized thousands globally to participate in annual World Prematurity Day events in November, including through the World Prematurity Network. In 2015, we introduced a disparity index score to rank state progress towards the elimination of racial/ethnic disparities in preterm birth through the annual U.S. Premature Birth Report Card. In collaboration with 12 global health organizations, March of Dimes launched the first World Birth Defects Day on March 3, 2015.

Also in 2015, March of Dimes sponsored and led the implementation of its 7th International Conference on Birth Defects and Disabilities in the Developing World, in Tanzania. This conference was attended by close to 300 participants from 29 countries and led to the publication of a consensus statement on Prevention of Congenital Disorders.

2014- Every Newborn Action Plan

March of Dimes commits to provide at least USD $60 million to support five trans disciplinary premature birth research centers at leading institutions in the United States from 2014 – 2020. The centers will take a team approach to discovery research directed at identifying the unknown causes of preterm birth. March of Dimes expects this commitment will lead to improved identification and treatment of women at risk of preterm labor. From 2014 – 2020, March of Dimes also commits to continuing to lead World Prematurity Day as an open platform for organizations to focus attention on premature birth as the leading cause of newborn death and to advocate for further action on prevention. An expected outcome from this effort is increased public awareness of the problem of preterm birth and enhanced political support for public programs and research that can improve prevention of prematurity.

2012—Born Too Soon

The March of Dimes commits to continuing its Prematurity Campaign through 2020, working to reduce the preterm birth rate in the United States to 9.6% or less, and helping to build a global constituency to reduce the toll of death and disability caused by preterm birth worldwide. The March of Dimes Prematurity Campaign devotes approximately $20 million annually to: 1) funding for biomedical research, and transdisciplinary research aimed at delineating the multi-factorial causes of premature birth; 2) collaboration with state governments, hospitals, and lower-income country partners to enhance the quality and accessibility of prenatal and newborn care; 3) provider education and consumer awareness campaigns to identify and reduce risk of prematurity, and provide guidance and comfort to parents of premature babies. The March of Dimes joined with parent groups to create and promote World Prematurity Day, November 17, to build a constituency for further action, including the recommendations in Born Too Soon.

2011

In support of Every Woman Every Child and the Global Strategy (2010-2015), the March of Dimes is committed to increasing international attention to and funding for research and programs to reduce the tragic toll of death and disability caused by preterm birth. The March of Dimes and the World Health Organization estimate that 13 million babies are born prematurely each year, and one million of these children die before their first birthday. The centerpiece of our campaign is the first-ever annual World Prematurity Day to be held on 17 November 2011. Partners in this initiative are the European Foundation for the Care of Newborns and Infants, based in Germany and representing 18 countries across Europe; Little Big Souls, based in Nigeria; and the National Preemie Foundation of Australia. Additional participating organizations are being identified in Asia, the eastern Mediterranean, sub-Saharan Africa, and Latin America to be welcomed into the global network in 2013. Each organization will determine the specific recommendations that are appropriate for their own country. We have created an international community of interested parents, professionals, NGOs, hospitals, donor organizations, and others at www.facebook.com/WorldPrematurityDay.
MODlogo RGB 4 340x83