20 February 2019

Johnson & Johnson

2018

Commitment Progress

In 2014, Johnson & Johnson committed USD $30 million to improve newborn health and increase newborn survival through 2020. This commitment will support programs in at least 20 countries with high newborn mortality, including an initial focus on India, Nigeria, China, and Ethiopia. The programs aim to increase the number and skills of birth attendants; reduce newborn mortality from birth asphyxia; increase the percentage of newborns at-risk for HIV who undergo early infant diagnosis; and expand the use of mobile phones to deliver health information for safe pregnancy and birth. Our partnerships also implement programs designed to improve the health-knowledge of pregnant women and mothers to care of themselves and their newborns.
As part of its EWEC commitment, Johnson & Johnson has committed 51million US dollars and supported programs that have reached over 8 million women and over 6 million newborns, and provided educational support to over 57,000 skilled birth attendants up to the end of 2018. (These numbers include re-calculated data for 2016 and 2017, based on our updating of definitions to reflect EWEC indicators).

Activities implemented in 2018 include:
Partnering for Maternal and Newborn Health:
Born on Time is our partnership with the Government of Canada in Bangladesh, Ethiopia and Mali to prevent preterm birth by targeting risk factors related to lifestyle, infection, contraception, and nutrition. By 2020, Born On Time aims to reach more than 1.8 million women and adolescent girls, and train more than 8000 healthcare providers, including 1,825 community health workers in Bangladesh, Ethiopia and Mali. Based on year two reporting, Johnson & Johnson has supported training of more than 4000 healthcare providers, and the program is poised to far exceed its initial five-year goals.
Save the Children programs in Ethiopia, the Philippines, Bangladesh and the United Kingdom supporting maternal, newborn, and child heath trained more than 900 healthcare providers. The Helping Babies Breathe (HBB) initiative, in partnership with Save the Children, has supported the training of skilled birth attendants in neonatal resuscitation in 11 countries to date, with the latest expansion of the program to Guatemala in 2018.

Expanding training partnership in Nigeria:
Johnson & Johnson’s partnership with the Wellbeing Foundation Africa (WBFA) and Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine was expanded in 2018 throughout Kwara State in Nigeria. The partnership, which was already active in several regions of Kwara State, focuses on quality of Emergency Obstetrics and Newborn Care (EmONC) service so that more mothers survive child birth and more newborns are born healthy.

“Partnerships like ours are so important because of the huge improvements that can readily be made. 80% of all maternal deaths result from five complications which can be treated by qualified and trained health professionals: hemorrhage, sepsis, eclampsia, complications of abortion and obstructed labor. Our training is successful because equips doctors, nurses and midwives, as a collective team, with the skills needed to overcome these obstetric emergencies.” Her Excellency Mrs Toyin Ojora Saraki, Founder-President of the Wellbeing Foundation Africa.

We also have a partnership with UNICEF on Reducing Maternal and Neonatal Mortality Among Indigenous Women in Vietnam, which is part of our expanded partnership with UNICEF for which we pledged $10 million (more details in text below)

2017

Commitment Progress

In 2014, Johnson & Johnson committed USD $30 million to improve newborn health and increase newborn survival through 2020. This commitment will support programs in at least 20 countries with high newborn mortality, including an initial focus on India, Nigeria, China, and Ethiopia.

The collaborations aim to increase the number and skills of birth attendants; reduce newborn mortality from birth asphyxia; increase the percentage of newborns at-risk for HIV who undergo early infant diagnosis; and expand the use of mobile phones to deliver health information for safe pregnancy and birth. Our partnerships also implement programs designed to improve the health-knowledge of pregnant women and mothers to care of themselves and their newborns.

As of end of 2017, Johnson & Johnson has supported programs that have reached 8 million women and 5.3 million newborns, and provided educational support to 85,000 skilled birth attendants.

Activities implemented in 2017 include:

Improving Newborn Survival in Urban Slums
J&J has partnered with Save the Children on the Improving Newborn Survival project aimed at ending preventable newborn deaths at three hospitals targeting the urban poor in Dhaka, Bangladesh. This project aims to strengthen Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) in these facilities, identified as a priority newborn intervention to reduce under-five mortality nationally. In addition, the project will focus on promoting KMC among the target population through demand creation, strengthening referral networks, and behavior change communications. Together the three hospitals cover urban slums and their adjacent peri-urban areas with a population of about 1,733,600. This 2-year project aims to train 200 healthcare workers, and is estimated to directly impact more than 3,000 newborns.

MomConnect/NurseConnect
In South Africa, 1.8 million pregnant women have used MomConnect, a National Department of Health (NDoH) service to improve maternal and child health. Mothers receive stage-based health information and access to a help desk for queries and feedback. In 2017, MomConnect added the highly popular WhatsApp platform. NurseConnect — a companion program for nurses and midwives— has grown to 20,000 nurses and provides official NDoH communications to nursing staff.

Proactive Community Case Management
Prematurity is a factor of 32% of newborn deaths in Mali. Muso’s Proactive Community Case Management (ProCCM) approach is designed to reach women earlier in their pregnancies and connect them with complete prenatal care. Johnson & Johnson has partnered with Muso in Mali to support Born On Time’s mission to prevent preterm birth by deploying and testing ProCCM solutions that include door-to-door proactive pregnancy testing, family planning services, and pregnancy dating techniques for a population of 275,000 people. These solutions that focus on achieving high rates of perinatal coverage could then be scaled across similar newborn survival initiatives.

2015

Johnson & Johnson’s commitment in 2014 to the Every Newborn Action Plan has been rolled over until 2020, to advance the Updated Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health.

Commitment Progress
As of the end of 2016, Johnson & Johnson has invested USD 19 million of its committed amount of $30 million, as part of the Every Newborn Action Plan (ENAP) to end preventable stillbirths and newborn deaths. Through implementing the ENAP commitment, J&J has reached 3.5M women and 2.8M newborns, and provided training and support to more than 46,000 health care providers across 29 high-priority countries with information, education, and access to quality healthcare and skilled birth attendants.

J&J adopts a system-wide approach to strengthen maternal, newborn, child, adolescent health which ensures longer-term, sustainable impact by training health workers, using innovation, increasing data collection capacity and making partnerships with key stakeholders. Some of these key programs include the following:

  • Neonatal Resuscitation Program; J&J trained more than 7,000 nurses and midwives to provide life-saving care to newborns in China, El Salvador, Kenya, Malawi, and Uganda, and over 1 million babies were provided with care.
  • MHealth initiatives; These support the use of mobile phones to deliver timely, important health information to expecting and new mothers in Bangladesh, China, India, and Nigeria
  • SPARK Health; More than 100 health care administrators were trained to improve capacity for data collection and monitoring of HIV mother-to-child-transmission in Malawi and Nigeria.
  • The Born on Time initiative; This was launched in 2015 to reduce preterm birth in Mali, Ethiopia and Bangladesh, and represents a unique public-private partnership between NGO, government and corporate partners such as the Government of Canada, Plan Canada, Save the Children, and World Vision Canada.

2014-Every Newborn Action Plan

Johnson & Johnson commits USD $30 million to improve newborn health and increase newborn survival through 2020. This commitment will support programs in at least 20 countries with high newborn mortality, including an initial focus on India, Nigeria, China, and Ethiopia. It will build on the progress made since the 2010 Every Woman Every Child commitment to ensure newborn survival and health remain central to the post-2015 development agenda. Johnson & Johnson will work with partners and governments to implement evidence-based interventions and innovative technologies or training methodologies. In some settings, we will work with partners to develop pilot programs, and in others, we will work to scale up effective strategies, depending on a country’s specific needs and readiness.

The collaborations will increase the number and skills of birth attendants; reduce newborn mortality from birth asphyxia; increase the percentage of newborns at-risk for HIV who undergo early infant diagnosis; and expand the use of mobile phones to deliver health information for safe pregnancy and birth. Our partnerships will also implement programs designed to improve the health-knowledge of pregnant women and mothers to care for themselves and their newborns.

2011

In September 2010, Johnson & Johnson made a five-year commitment in response to the United Nations’ Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health to achieve the Millennium Development Goals focused on women’s and children’s health by 2015. Our commitment seeks to increase life expectancy and quality-of-life and, by the year 2015, we aim to be reaching at least 120 million women and children per year in 50 countries through partnerships. As one of the first private sector leaders to answer the Secretary-General’s call for increased resourcing, attention, innovation and progress for women’s and children’s health, Johnson & Johnson recognizes the important role of integrated approaches and comprehensive collaborations to support sustainable progress towards MDGs four and five working closely with and through the United Nations. The newest efforts in delivering on our commitment is also the first-ever corporate partner to a joint (H4+) UN program, a 4-year partnership with UNFPA, UNICEF, the World Bank, WHO and UNAIDS (collectively known as the H4+ agencies). The program’s aim is to help reducing maternal and infant mortality in Tanzania and Ethiopia by building healthcare capacity and training skilled birth attendants.

2010

Johnson & Johnson commits $200 million over the next 5 years for a package of commitments called ‘Every Mother, Every Child’ that aims to help as many as 120 million women and children each year. Every Mother, Every Child aims to increase life expectancy and quality-of-life for women and children in the developing world. Johnson & Johnson is committed to providing more than 15 million expectant and new mothers in Bangladesh, China, India, Mexico, Nigeria, and South Africa with free mobile phone messages on prenatal health, reminders of clinic appointments and calls from health mentors over the five-year program. Johnson & Johnson will also donate 200 million doses, each year, of mebendazole, a treatment for intestinal worms in children. Johnson & Johnson is also committed to researching and developing a drug for tuberculosis with a new mechanism of action in 40 years, antiretrovirals to treat HIV and potentially prevent HIV transmission from pregnant women to their infants, as well as new technologies that may, in the future, prevent the transmission of HIV between adults. Johnson & Johnson is also committed to extending current commitments to peer education programs that have been successful in preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV; reducing a life-threatening condition in infants caused by lack of oxygen at birth (birth asphyxia); and upgrading existing health care facilities to accommodate more women at risk of fistulas.

Learn More

  • Commitment implemented in 65 countries across 5 continents
  • More than $151 million USD in cash grants and product donations and millions more in R&D
  • 190 million children and 7.8 million women reached through all programs:
  • 355 million doses of VERMOX® deworming treatments for approximately 177 million children;  
  • More than 520,000 pregnant women reached with counseling and services to prevent mother- to-child transmission of HIV treatment at 348 mothers2mothers sites 
  • 525,000 expectant and new mothers and women reached through text messages from the Mobile Alliance for Maternal Action (MAMA) and other programs 
  • Skilled health workers attended more than 11 million births. 
  • Trained and supported health care workers to help more than 12.6 million women and children in high-burden countries including India, Nigeria, China, Uganda, Malawi and South Africa 
  • Trained over 197,000 health workers who care for women and their families

* Cumulative results are through mid-2013 based on latest available tracking data as of August 2014.
Johnson Johnson

Learn More