07 September 2014

Save the Children Launches Report on Malnutrition in Support of Every Woman Every Child

Hidden Malnutrition Crisis to Put Almost Half a Billion Children at Risk without Global Action
Chronic malnutrition is preventable, but remains deadlier and more widespread than food scarcity

 Media Contact:  Lori Adelman, 646-559-6982, ladelman@unfoundation.org

New York, NY. (February 15, 2012) — Despite global efforts to address food security, chronic childhood malnutrition has been largely overlooked, putting almost half a billion children at risk of permanent damage in the next 15 years, Save the Children said in a new report released today.

“Malnutrition is a largely hidden crisis, but it afflicts one in four children around the world,” said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children. “It wreaks lifelong damage and is a major killer of children.  Every hour of every day, 300 children die because of malnutrition.”

Save the Children’s new report, titled “A Life Free from Hunger: Tackling Child Malnutrition,” was released as the world begins to awaken to the latest emergency food crisis, in the African Sahel.  But the report reveals that chronic malnutrition, or a lack of proper nutrition over time, is deadlier and far more widespread than the short-term acute malnutrition frequently seen during food crises. 

Chronic malnutrition weakens young children’s immune systems, leaving them more likely to die of childhood diseases like diarrhea, pneumonia and malaria.  It leads to 2 million child deaths a year, three times as many as result from acute malnutrition. 

But, chronic malnutrition also leaves children far more vulnerable to extreme suffering and death from acute malnutrition when emergency food crises hit, as in the Horn of Africa and the Sahel right now.  In total, malnutrition underlies 2.6 million child deaths every year, or one third of all child deaths. 

“It’s time for a paradigm shift.  The world can no longer afford to wait until visibly emaciated children grab headlines to inspire the action these children need and deserve.  Unfortunately for millions of the world’s chronically malnourished children, permanent damage to their physical and intellectual development is not as obvious, and so it’s too often overlooked,” said Miles.

Save the Children’s new report calls for action on proven solutions that would prevent these deaths and help all children affected by hunger and malnutrition.  Progress on reducing malnutrition has been extremely slow for 20 years, in comparison to great strides made on other global health crises.

Well-nourished children perform better in school and grow up to earn considerably more on average than those who were malnourished as children.  Recent evidence suggests nutritional interventions can increase adult earnings by 46 percent.  Malnutrition costs many developing nations an estimated 2-3 percent of their GDP, extends the cycle of poverty, and impedes global economic growth at a critical time.

“World leaders are searching for ways to strengthen their economies over the long term, so why not achieve that through helping children get the healthy start they deserve?” Miles said.

Growing Consensus

More than 100 organizations have endorsed the Scaling Up Nutrition framework to fight malnutrition that was developed in 2010, including United Nations agencies, governments, private companies, development agencies, research institutions and the World Bank.  The framework reflects unprecedented consensus around the need to address chronic malnutrition, also known as stunting. 

As Save the Children released its new report, United Nations leaders endorsed its call to action.

Ban Ki-moon, the United Nations Secretary General said: “We must end the hidden tragedy of stunting, which affects 200 million children.  Food and nutrition security are high on my action agenda for the next five years.  I urge all partners to do their utmost to rise to this challenge. Together, we can unlock the potential of current and future generations.”

UNICEF’s Executive Director Anthony Lake said:  “Stunting is rarely obvious until it is too late. The first 1,000 days of life determines a child’s life forever – before birth until the 2nd birthday.  After that it is simply too late to repair the damage to the bodies and brains of a child. We are encouraged though there is now an awakening around stunting thanks to the leadership of many governments and the Scaling Up Nutrition movement.”

Lagging Action from World Leaders

While addressing food security, world leaders have galvanized much-needed support to boost agricultural productivity, but they have yet to make nutrition central to their efforts.  In 2009, President Obama helped spearhead the L’Aquila Food Security Initiative, which inspired $22 billion in pledges at the G8 and G20 meetings.  Yet, only 3 percent of these pledges and less than 1 percent of pledges fulfilled to date have targeted nutrition.

“Investment in agriculture is clearly important to making sure production keeps up with a growing population,” said Miles.  “But let’s not forget, right now the world produces enough food to feed everybody, and yet one third of children in developing countries are malnourished.  Clearly, just growing more food is not the answer.”

“The United States has shown great leadership on nutrition, but now must call on other powerful nations to make it a global priority,” she added.

Many expect President Obama will again address food security when he hosts this spring’s G8 meeting in Chicago.  Save the Children is calling on the G8 to extend food security funding at current levels for three years while including greater focus on nutrition.

A Solvable Crisis

According to seminal research published in the Lancet medical journal in 2008, a set of 13 basic interventions could prevent the vast majority of malnutrition, especially in the critical 1,000-day window between conception and age 2.  These include encouraging breastfeeding to avoid contaminated water, proper introduction of varied foods for infants, fortification of basic staples and vitamin supplementation.

The World Bank has estimated the cost of getting these solutions to 90 percent of the children who need them would annually save 2 million lives and cost $10 billion.  Split among developing and developed countries, that sum is manageable, Save the Children says.

If the world fails to act and the current rate of progress of reducing chronic malnutrition continues at less than 1 percent a year, 450 million children will be affected in the next 15 years, Save the Children says.  

Nutrition Key to Child Health and Survival

Efforts to reduce childhood malnutrition feed into Every Woman Every Child, an unprecedented global movement spearheaded by United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to mobilize and intensify global action to improve the health of women and children around the world. Working with leaders from governments, multilateral organizations, the private sector and civil society, Every Woman Every Child aims to save the lives of 16 million women and children by 2015 and improve the lives of millions more.

Save the Children has committed to support Every Woman Every Child with up to $500 million per year over 5 years, including $150 million contributed by private individuals, to: promote policy changes that accelerate progress on MDG4; expand and intensify efforts to integrate proven technology into health systems to protect newborns in 12 priority countries; train 400,000 health workers; mobilize civil society to hold governments accountable; engage with multi-sector partners to help deliver life-saving programming.

###

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world.

Launched by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon during the United Nations Millennium Development Goals Summit in September 2010, Every Woman Every Child aims to save the lives of 16 million women and children by 2015.

Media Contact:  Lori Adelman, 646-559-6982, ladelman@unfoundation.org

 


07 September 2014

Fashion Industry Moves to Support Women and Youth

New York, NY (February 14, 2012) – Fashion 4 Development (F4D), a global platform that works to advance the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), announced today its commitment to bring together the fashion community with governments, civil society, media, and international organizations with the aim to harness the power and economic opportunities of the fashion industry to lift from poverty the most vulnerable, particularly women and youth. By scouting and supporting local crafts, talents and manufacturers in the developing world, and brokering market access and opportunities in rich countries, Fashion 4 Development aims to use the fashion industry to create sustainable development initiatives, particularly target to women and youth.

“Creating a link between fashion and development can be key to sustainable development. We can create jobs in local communities, create greater wellbeing and give them the dignity which they deserve” said today editor-in-chief of Vogue Italia, Ms. Franca Sozzani, first Goodwill Ambassador of Fashion 4 Development. “This is a business that largely employs women, so we can use this not only as a way to create economic income but also advance women’s empowerment and gender equality”.

“We are making our contribution by mobilizing the global fashion industry to implement creative strategies for sustainable economic growth and empowerment of communities worldwide. We urge those who already invest in Africa and other countries in most need to join us in doing even more, involving new partners and being innovative in support of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals” echoed Global Chair of Fashion 4 Development,  Ms Evie Evangelou.

Recognizing the links between women’s empowerment and women’s and children’s health, Fashion 4 Development announced in particular their commitment to act as a catalyst for urgent action against preventable death and disease among the world’s most vulnerable people. To that end, Fashion 4 Development joins the Every Woman Every Child movement, an unprecedented global effort spearheaded by the Secretary-General of the United Nations, to mobilize and intensify global action to improve the health of women and children around the world. By mobilizing the fashion industry sensitizing as well as actively supporting the implementation of the Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health, the framework for action for Every Woman Every Child, Fashion 4 Development joins governments, multilateral organizations, the private sector and civil society, in a global effort to save the lives of 16 million women and children by 2015.

“Each year, millions of women and children die from pregnancy, childbirth and preventable causes. These deaths can and must be stopped, we know what works.” said Robert Orr, UN Assistant Secretary General for Policy Planning in the Executive Office of the Secretary-General. “Everyone has a role to play in our common goal to save these lives. The private sector has real potential to become a game-changer in our efforts to put an end to the paradox of women dying while giving life.”

“So many women and children die from preventable causes,” said Mrs. Toyin Saraki, Founder and Chair of The Wellbeing Foundation Africa (WBFA), an early supporter of Every Woman Every Child and long-time advocate for maternal and children’s health in Africa, “but through new commitments and connections such as Fashion 4 Development’s, so many can survive, lead healthy lives, and contribute to their communities. WBFA is excited about our continued role as a catalyst and a bridge to bringing international partnerships such as the fashion industry to bear on the maternal, newborn and child health challenge across Africa.”

“I am convinced that Fashion – among Italy’s most qualifying industrial assets – can be another tool to enhance the Italian contribution to achieving the UN Millennium Development Goals and, more broadly, the United Nations’ mission. The initiative Fashion 4 Development is a promising and tangible prove of such endeavour. Thanks to the passion and dedication of Franca Sozzani, a leading figure in the Italian Fashion world and now Goodwill Ambassador of Fashion 4 Development, several African producers and young designers will find an export opportunity for their goods, promoting “made in Africa” apparel and accessories that will appeal to Western markets and create development opportunities.  It is a fascinating challenge that Italy is supporting, convinced that such efforts can help making a difference” expressed Ambassador Cesare Maria Ragaglini, Italian Permanent Representative to the United Nations.

 
###
 

About Fashion4Development
Fashion 4 Development (“F4D”) is a global awareness campaign that unites diplomacy, media, business and the creative industries for the purpose of helping to achieve the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).  F4D is a global platform with partners interested in the universal investment in people and the planet.  In full support of the United Nations, F4D seeks to harness the power of the fashion and beauty industries to implement creative strategies for sustainable economic growth and autonomy for individuals and communities worldwide. The core principles that underlie the mission of Fashion 4 Development dare to Educate, Empower, Enhance, and Enrich the lives of all those involved in its cooperative effort

About Every Woman Every Child
Launched by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon during the United Nations Millennium Development Goals Summit in September 2010, Every Woman Every Child is a global effort that brings together governments, international organizations, civil society and the private sector with the aim to save the lives of 16 million women and children by 2015 and improve the lives of millions more. To date, almost 200 partners have made joined Every Woman Every Child. All common efforts put into action the Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health, which presents a roadmap on how to enhance financing, strengthen policy and improve service on the ground for the most vulnerable women and children.  
 


07 September 2014

The Innovation Working Group and the mHealth Alliance Announce Grantees to Improve Women’s and Children’s Health Using Mobile Technology

Washington, DC  – On December 6 at the 2011 mHealth Summit, the Innovation Working Groupand the mHealth Alliance announced the recipients of eight catalytic grants for mobile health (mHealth) programs. The grants, funded by the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (Norad), are designed to identify and foster innovative uses of mobile technology to advance maternal and newborn health, with a special focus on growing programs with sustainable financing models and early indications of impact.

Read the full release.


07 September 2014

A New Global Focus on Preterm Births

World Prematurity Day highlights effective, low-cost care
New commitments to address the problem

Contacts:
Marshall Hoffman, H&H, +1 703 533-3535, +1 703 801-8602 (mob); marshall@hoffmanpr.com
Nils Hoffman, H&H Video, +1 703 967-1490; nils@hoffmanpr.com
Michele Kling, MoD, +1 914 997-4613, +1 914 843-9487 (mob); mkling@marchofdimes.com
Fadéla Chaib, WHO,  +41 22 791 32 28, +41 79 475 55 56 (mob); chaibf@who.int
Mike Kiernan, Save The Children, +1 202 640 6664 , +1 202 412 7579 (mob); mkiernan@savechildren.org

Additional Background and Resources:

Background materials on Born Too Soon report and preterm birth: http://everywomaneverychild.org/borntoosoon
Every Woman Every Child commitments to preterm birth: http://everywomaneverychild.org/commitments (search by “issue area”)
For TV Producers: B-roll on the Hoffman & Hoffman website: www.hoffmanpr.com/world/preterm/B-roll
Facebook for parent stories and an interactive map of preterm births: www.facebook.com/WorldPrematurityDay

Preterm birth is the world’s largest killer of newborn babies, causing more than 1 million deaths each year, yet 75 percent could be saved without expensive, high technology care.

That’s the primary message and motivating theme of World Prematurity Day, November 17, a global effort to raise awareness of the deaths and disabilities due to prematurity and the simple, proven, cost-effective measures that could prevent them.

On World Prematurity Day, countries in nearly every part of the world will take action to raise awareness of what can be done to reduce preterm births and better care for babies born too soon.

Families affected by premature birth can share stories, photos, and videos, and identify their locations on an interactive world map on facebook.com/WorldPrematurityDay. More than 700,000 visited this website in 2011.

“People think that preterm babies need intensive, high-tech care, but we have simple methods that really work and would save hundreds of thousands of lives,” says Joy Lawn, M.D., Ph.D., of Save the Children, a neonatal physician.

12.6 million moderate to late preterm births

Babies born between 32 and less than 37 completed weeks of pregnancy make up 85 percent of the 15 million preterm babies born annually –12.6 million.

“These babies are born too soon, but they are not born to die,” says Dr. Lawn. “Their deaths are utterly preventable.”

“We know what it takes to address the challenge of prematurity and we are committed to bringing partners together behind proven, affordable solutions,” says UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon who launched The Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health in 2010. The Global Strategy is supported by Every Woman Every Child, an umbrella movement that has already leveraged more than $20 billion in new money and aims to save the lives of 16 million by 2015.

The countries with the greatest numbers of moderate to late preterm births annually are:

India –2,959,300; China –981,050; Nigeria –665,080; Pakistan –633,640; Indonesia –564,350; United States –438,410; Bangladesh –355,030; Philippines –295,780; Democratic Republic of Congo –291,750; and Brazil –233,320.

Essential newborn care

“Essential newborn care is especially important for babies born preterm,” said Elizabeth Mason, M.D., Director of WHO’s Department of Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health. “This means keeping them warm, clean, and well-fed, and ensuring that babies who have difficulty breathing get immediate attention.”

Three low-cost interventions that are very effective, but are not commonly used, are:

·         Steroid injections. When given to mothers in preterm labor, dexamethosone, a steroid used to treat asthma, helps speed up the development of the baby’s lungs. At a cost of about US$1, two shots can stop premature babies from going into respiratory distress when they are born. This can prevent 400,000 deaths annually.

·         Kangaroo Mother Care. Using this technique, the tiny infant is held skin-to-skin on the mother’s chest. This keeps the baby warm and facilitates breastfeeding. Keeping preterm babies warm is especially important because their tiny bodies lose heat rapidly, making them highly vulnerable to illness, infection and death. This could prevent 450,000 deaths annually.

·         In addition, basic antibiotics can save lives, such as amoxicillin to treat pneumonia and injection antibiotics to fight serious infections.

“Using an essential package of pregnancy, childbirth and postnatal care that includes these interventions will save more than three quarters of preterm babies without intensive care,” says Carole Presern, Ph.D., head of The Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health (PMNCH) and a midwife. “Most of these infants can grow up healthy and without lifelong disabilities.”

Prevention is the next frontier

A key way to reduce the burden of preterm birth is to find ways to help pregnancies go to full term, or at least 39 weeks.

“Prevention is the next frontier,” says Christopher Howson, Ph.D.,Vice President of Global Programs for the March of Dimes and an epidemiologist. “We are looking closely at what can be done before a woman gets pregnant to help her have an optimal outcome.”

A number of risk factors for mothers to deliver prematurely have been identified, including a prior history of preterm birth, underweight, obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, smoking, infection, age (either under 17 or over 40), genetics, multiple pregnancy (twins, triplets, and more) and pregnancies spaced too closely together.

“We also know that poverty, lack of women’s education, malaria and HIV all have an impact on the pregnancy and the health of the baby,” says Dr. Howson. “However, little is known about the interplay of these and other environmental and social factors in increasing the risk of preterm birth. We need to know more and this knowledge could have a big impact in the lowest income countries.”

Documented success for steroid use and Kangaroo Mother Care

In high-income countries, steroids have been widely used for women in preterm labor since the 1990s and an estimated 95 percent of women in preterm labor before 34 weeks of pregnancy now receive steroid injections prior to delivery.

By comparison, in low- and middle-income countries, only an estimated 5 percent of women receive these steroid injections.

Dr. Lawn says that these medicines are rarely used in the developing world, despite the low cost and proven effectiveness, because health care professionals do not know about this life-saving use. In fact, antenatal steroids are now identified by a new UN-led Commission on Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children as an essential medicine that should be available everywhere.

“The use of steroids should be part of the ‘to do’ list of everyone looking after women in pregnancy. It should be written on hospital walls,” says Dr. Lawn. “In America or Europe, if a woman in preterm labor were not given steroid injections, the doctor could be sued for malpractice, as this is the standard of care. Why should a woman in Africa or Asia not get the same care, especially given the low cost?”

Kangaroo Mother Care started as a solution for overcrowded nurseries in Colombia where tiny infants were forced to share what incubators were available. The technique works well for both mothers and babies. Studies show that the mortality rate for babies who benefit from Kangaroo Mother Care can be the same or better than that for babies in incubators.

Though Kangaroo Mother Care was developed in 1967, the spread has been slow despite the well-documented effectiveness and its benefits for child development.

“One reason for the slow spread in some areas could simply be a lack of information about what works,” says Dr. Presern. “Another may be that many obstetricians, midwives and nurses find it hard to accept that such a natural approach could be superior to expensive high technology equipment.”

Countries make new commitments

On World Prematurity Day, a number of countries will announce major commitments to reduce preterm mortality. These countries have each adopted packages of interventions to care for premature babies and are championing initiatives in their countries and others. For example:

·         Malawi has the world’s highest preterm birth rate, a statistic that led the Vice President Khumbo Kachali and the country’s health leaders to prioritize care for preterm babies, instituting Kangaroo Mother Care and providing steroid injections in almost all hospitals.

·         India—with nearly 3 million moderate to late preterm births, the largest number in the world, and 304,000 preterm deaths per year—has been working with support from UNICEF to outfit 100 district hospitals to care for preterm babies.

·        Uganda has committed to speeding access to steroid injections for all women in preterm labor.

 Born Too Soon report stimulates activity

Publication of the Born Too Soon report in May 2012 by the March of Dimes, PMNCH, the World Health Organization and Save the Children drew global attention to what many consider one of the world’s most overlooked public health problems. The report included the first country-by-country statistics for both absolute numbers and rates of preterm birth, documenting the extent and severity of the problem, also published in The Lancet.

The report showed that preterm births are not solely a problem of the developing world, but that wealthy countries, including the United States and Brazil, were also in the top 10, in terms of absolute numbers. To mark the publication of the report, more than 30 organizations made new or enhanced commitments in support of the Every Woman Every Child effort launched by the United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon.

About World Prematurity Day
Started last year by the March of Dimes and founding parent groups –European Foundation for the Care of Newborn Infants (EFCNI), Africa-based Little Big Souls International Foundation and the National Premmie Foundation of Australia— World Prematurity Day will this year spread throughout the world, now involving more than 50 countries and groups globally.

Events are planned in many countries, including the United States, China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Malawi, Uganda and Argentina, to draw public attention to the problem of preterm birth and the simple care that can save many of these babies.

*           *          *

 

Born Too Soon Supporters: Governments, United Nations agencies, development partners, foundations, civil society, parents’ organizations, health professional associations, academia, and the private sector.

 

The Aga Khan University, American Academy of Pediatrics, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses, Australian Aid, Bliss UK, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Canadian International Development Agency, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Countdown to 2015, European Foundation for Care of Newborn Infants, Family Care International, Flour Fortification Initiative, GAVI Alliance, General Electric, Global Alliance to Prevent Prematurity and Stillbirth, Home for Premature Babies (China), Institute for Clinical Effectiveness for Health Policy, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics, International Confederation of Midwives, International Pediatric Association, International Preterm Birth Collaborative, Japan International Cooperation Agency, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Ecole de Santé Publique, Université de Kinshasa, Little Big Souls International Foundation Africa and UK, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, National Premmie Foundation Australia, Nationwide Children’s, National Collaborative Perinatal Neonatal Network, Norwegian Agency for International Development, Peking University Center of Medical Genetics, Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, Tommy’s, UK Department for International Development, UNICEF, United Nations Foundation, United Nations Population Fund, United States Agency for International Development, University College London, University of Malawi, University of Texas Medical Branch, Institute of Human Genetics (University of the Philippines), Women Deliver.

 

 


Countries and territories

 

Number of moderate to late preterm births

(32 to <37 completed weeks) (2011)

Number of deaths due to preterm birth complications (2011)

India

2,959,300

          304,050

China

                981,050

            34,560

Nigeria

                665,080

            83,510

Pakistan

                633,640

            62,800

Indonesia

                564,350

            29,220

United States

                438,410

             6,400

Bangladesh

                355,030

            35,490

Philippines

                295,780

            11,290

Democratic Republic of the Congo

                291,750

            43,600

Brazil

                233,320

             9,480

Ethiopia

                222,110

            29,100

United Republic of Tanzania

                184,560

            16,930

Uganda

                176,770

            16,090

Kenya

                161,690

            14,320

Afghanistan

                137,010

            17,520

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

                136,950

             7,740

Mexico

                135,820

             5,280

Turkey

                130,000

             4,470

Sudan

                123,760

            12,310

Mozambique

                123,000

             9,790

Viet Nam

                115,870

             5,660

Egypt

                115,700

             6,300

Malawi

                104,450

             6,680

Yemen

                104,390

            10,270

Russian Federation

                  99,730

             4,150

Ghana

                  94,780

             8,270

Madagascar

                  89,460

             6,080

Myanmar

                  85,990

            11,550

Nepal

                  85,460

            10,140

Angola

                  84,320

            11,380

Thailand

                  83,470

             2,340

Côte d’Ivoire

                  80,230

             9,250

Cameroon

                  75,800

             8,120

South Africa

                  71,000

             8,320

Mali

                  70,980

            11,800

Zambia

                  67,930

             6,320

Colombia

                  67,820

             3,290

Burkina Faso

                  66,980

             8,280

Iraq

                  63,100

             7,140

Niger

                  61,680

             9,770

Malaysia

                  60,080

                740

Chad

                  56,210

             7,440

Germany

                  54,510

                630

Japan

                  53,370

                210

Zimbabwe

                  52,560

             4,110

United Kingdom

                  50,280

             1,200

Argentina

                  46,680

             2,180

Guinea

                  46,310

             5,120

France

                  44,750

                300

Algeria

                  44,370

             4,940

Uzbekistan

                  43,080

             3,390

Syrian Arab Republic

                  42,630

             1,880

Somalia

                  41,880

             6,490

Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of)

                  41,010

             2,020

Senegal

                  38,650

             4,250

Republic of Korea

                  37,140

                500

Peru

                  36,560

             2,170

Rwanda

                  36,040

             3,270

Morocco

                  34,850

             5,230

Sri Lanka

                  33,760

                470

Benin

                  31,650

             3,690

Haiti

                  31,630

             2,550

Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

                  31,470

             2,700

Spain

                  31,340

                310

Guatemala

                  30,740

             2,430

Saudi Arabia

                  30,590

             1,630

Italy

                  30,540

                420

Cambodia

                  28,210

             2,680

Burundi

                  27,600

             4,270

Ukraine

                  27,240

                750

Kazakhstan

                  25,680

             1,810

Canada

                  25,440

                510

Poland

                  23,250

                700

Togo

                  21,790

             2,490

Honduras

                  20,950

                920

Congo

                  20,380

             1,570

Bolivia (Plurinational State of)

                  20,080

             2,210

Eritrea

                  19,880

             1,520

Australia

                  19,800

                260

Dominican Republic

                  19,570

             1,110

Sierra Leone

                  19,130

             3,540

Jordan

                  18,660

                940

Liberia

                  18,340

             1,450

Tajikistan

                  17,510

             1,650

Central African Republic

                  16,560

             2,340

Mauritania

                  15,340

             1,570

Chile

                  14,710

                420

El Salvador

                  13,600

                290

Romania

                  13,540

                420

Tunisia

                  13,430

                700

Azerbaijan

                  13,130

             1,460

Lao People’s Democratic Republic

                  12,750

                890

Ecuador

                  12,750

             1,070

Netherlands

                  12,250

                100

Kyrgyzstan

                  11,540

                730

Papua New Guinea

                  11,500

             1,740

Nicaragua

                  10,850

                690

Israel

                  10,570

                110

Paraguay

                  10,330

                870

Libyan Arab Jamahiriya

                  10,070

                630

Turkmenistan

                    9,080

                910

Costa Rica

                    8,440

                130

Belgium

                    8,190

                  70

Gambia

                    7,880

                790

Mongolia

                    7,400

                300

Namibia

                    7,310

                410

Hungary

                    7,210

                140

Czech Republic

                    7,110

                  60

Austria

                    6,740

                  70

Greece

                    6,520

                210

Portugal

                    6,240

                  50

Serbia

                    6,160

                270

Lesotho

                    6,070

                860

United Arab Emirates

                    6,010

                170

Botswana

                    6,000

                210

Oman

                    5,960

                110

Cuba

                    5,870

                  50

Gabon

                    5,720

                380

Sweden

                    5,660

                  30

Guinea-Bissau

                    5,560

                850

Switzerland

                    4,800

                  80

Panama

                    4,790

                190

Bulgaria

                    4,730

                190

Singapore

                    4,570

                  20

Timor-Leste

                    4,520

                370

Kuwait

                    4,480

                  90

Republic of Moldova

                    4,380

                  50

Armenia

                    4,360

                200

Jamaica

                    4,320

                230

Lebanon

                    4,290

                140

Uruguay

                    4,230

                  80

New Zealand

                    4,100

                  60

Swaziland

                    4,080

                460

Comoros

                    3,900

                290

Ireland

                    3,870

                  50

Georgia

                    3,780

                270

Belarus

                    3,730

                  90

Equatorial Guinea

                    3,650

                310

Denmark

                    3,590

                  70

Albania

                    3,120

                110

Norway

                    3,080

                  20

Slovakia

                    3,070

                110

Finland

                    2,850

                  30

Bahrain

                    2,770

                  30

Djibouti

                    2,620

                300

Bosnia and Herzegovina

                    2,110

                  50

Croatia

                    2,000

                  20

Qatar

                    1,890

                  40

Solomon Islands

                    1,810

                  60

Mauritius

                    1,740

                  60

Lithuania

                    1,680

                  20

Cyprus

                    1,600

                  10

Fiji

                    1,530

                  60

Guyana

                    1,500

                  90

Trinidad and Tobago

                    1,350

                  90

Slovenia

                    1,280

                  10

Bhutan

                    1,270

                150

Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia  

                    1,250

                  80

Latvia

                    1,090

                  10

Cape Verde

                        960

                  40

Estonia

                        790

                  –  

Brunei Darussalam

                        780

                  10

Vanuatu

                        780

                  10

Suriname

                        710

                  70

Belize

                        680

                  –  

Montenegro

                        590

                  10

Sao Tome and Principe

                        460

                  50

Bahamas

                        430

                  10

Luxembourg

                        410

                  –  

Other

2,920

110

World

12,592,050

 

1,032,710

 

 

Born Too Soon: The Global Action Report on Preterm Birth – Updated for 2011with live births and neonatal mortality estimates for 2011 from The UN Interagency Group for Child Mortality Estimation.

Data sources:
Numbers of babies with moderate to late preterm birth: Blencowe H, Cousens S, Oestergaard M, Chou D, Moller AB, Narwal R, Adler A, Garcia CV, Rohde S, Say L, Lawn JE. National, regional and worldwide estimates of preterm birth, The Lancet, June 2012.

Deaths due to preterm birth complications data: Liu L, Johnson HL, Cousens S, Lawn JE et al. 2012. Global, regional, and national causes of child mortality in 2000–2010: an updated systematic analysis. The Lancet, June 2012. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(12)60560-1.

Preterm birth prevention analysis: Hannah H. Chang, Jim Larson, Hannah Blencowe, Catherine Y. Spong, Christopher P. Howson, Sarah Cairns-Smith, Eve M. Lackritz, Shoo K. Lee, Elizabeth Mason, Andrew C. Serazin, Salimah Walani, Joe Leigh Simpson, Joy E. Lawn. Preventing preterm births: trends and potential reductions with current interventions in 39 very high human development index countries. The Lancet in press.


07 September 2014

UN Commission sets out plan to make life-saving health supplies more accessible

READ THE COMMISSION’S REPORT HERE.

UNITED NATIONS, New York, 26 September2012 – A new plan and set of recommendations to improve the supply and access of life-saving health supplies was submitted today to the UN Secretary-General by the members of the United Nations Commission on Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children.

The Commission is part of the Every Woman Every Child movement and was formed to support the UN Secretary-General’s Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health, with the aim of ending the suffering of women and children around the world caused by lack of access to life-saving commodities. The Secretary-General called on the global community to work together to save 16 million lives by 2015. The Commission seeks to meet this challenge by improving access and use of essential medicines, medical devices and health supplies that effectively address causes of death during pregnancy, childbirth and into childhood.

President Goodluck Jonathan of Nigeria and Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg of Norway, who co-chair the Commission, expressed their continued commitment to improving access to these supplies. Other commissioners, as well as UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake and UNFPA Executive Director Babatunde Osotimehin, who serve as Commission vice-chairs, echoed the call to action.

“I am pleased to see the Commission’s work presented here today and am committed to seeing these important recommendations implemented at country level, where they will impact millions of lives,” said President Goodluck Jonathan of Nigeria. “As co-chair of this important Commission, I will be hosting a meeting in Abuja later this year to discuss with ministers from other countries how we will rapidly translate this work into tangible action for women and children.”

“In spite of promising decline in maternal and child mortality with around 40 percent since 1990, the fact that the day a woman gives birth is still the most dangerous day in her and her child’s life is unacceptable,” said Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg of Norway. “The Commission’s recommendations are concrete and represent highly cost effective interventions.”

The recommended steps include bulk buying, local manufacturing and innovative marketing to help transform the supply, demand and use of quality life-saving products. It is estimated that hundreds of thousands of women and children’s lives could be saved each year with essential supplies, including for family planning. Medicines for the prevention of bleeding after childbirth and treatment of diarrhoea and pneumonia such as oral rehydration solution and zinc and amoxicillin – which cost less than 50 cents per treatment — can make the difference between life and death for mothers and their babies.

“It is simply wrong that millions of children and women still die every year when we have the products and the knowledge to save their lives,” said UNICEF Executive Director  Anthony Lake. “With the Commission’s help, we have still more practical solutions. What is needed now is the political will to implement them.”

As a result of better planning, increased financial resources, bulk buying, and joint procurement, the availability of long-lasting insecticide-treated bed nets (LLINs) in sub-Saharan Africa has shot up from 5.6 million in 2004 to 145 million in 2010 and contributed to a substantial reduction in malarial deaths on the continent.

“We are committed to increasing support to the implementation of the recommendations of the Commission, especially regarding maternal health and family planning,” said UNFPA Executive Director, Dr. Babatunde Osotimehin. “Access to voluntary family planning saves lives. We have to make sure that all women and girls have access to the reproductive health services and supplies they want and need. This is not only a matter of human rights, but also a matter of life and death. Moreover, healthier women and girls have more chances of fulfilling their potential and becoming more productive citizens.”

The Commission examined 13 medicines and health supplies, focusing on 50 countries with high death rates among women, newborns, and children under five due to preventable causes. 

During the event, President Bill Clinton, founder of the William J. Clinton Foundation and 42nd President of the United States, delivered remarks in support of the commission’s work.

Commissioners

1.     Sir Andrew Witty, Chief Executive Officer, GlaxoSmithKline

2.     Agnès Saint-Raymond, Head of Human Medicines Special Areas, European Medicines Agency

3.     Bob Collymore, Chief Executive Officer, Safaricom

4.     Christopher Elias, President for Global Development, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

5.     Dan Brutto, President, UPS International

6.     Gary Cohen, Executive Vice President, BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company)

7.     Hassan Mshinda, Director General Tanzania Commission for Science and Technology

8.     Heather Bresch, CEO , MylanInc

9.     Jamie Cooper-Hohn, President and CEO, Children’s Investment Fund Foundation

10. Jasmine Whitbread, Chief Executive Officer, Save the Children International

11. Julio Frenk, Chair, Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health

12. Kenneth C. Frazier, President and CEO, Merck

13. Rajiv Shah, Administrator, United States Agency for International Development

14. Ray Chambers, UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Malaria

15. Li Dongjiu (Robert Lee), President, Shanghai Fosun Pharmaceutical Development Co., Ltd.

16. M.K. Bhan, Secretary to the Government of India Department of Biotechnology

17. Michael Anderson, Director-General for Policy and Global Programmes, UK Department for International Development

18. Per Heggenes, CEO, IKEA Foundation

19. TeguestGuerma, Director General, AMREF

20. ZainabHawaBangura, UN Special Representative on Sexual Violence in Conflict

 About the UN Commission on Life-saving Commodities for Women and Children
The Commission was created by the UN Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon, under the auspices of the Every Woman Every Child initiative.The Commission aims to increase access to life-saving medicines and health supplies for the world’s most vulnerable people.The Commission is co-chaired by President Goodluck Jonathan of Nigeria and Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg of Norway and UNICEF and UNFPA serve as vice-chairs.www.everywomaneverychild.org/resources/un-commission-on-life-saving-commodities

About Every Woman Every Child
Every Woman Every Child is an unprecedented global movement, spearheaded by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, to mobilize and intensify global action to improve the health of women and children around the world. In the two years since its launch, the Every Woman Every Child movement has seen remarkable progress, bringing new attention and investment  to some of the most neglected causes of women’s and children’s mortality, including preterm birth and contraceptive access most recently. A number of key advocacy moments and events served as catalysts for change in 2012 in support of Every Woman Every Child:  April saw the launch of the UN Commission on Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children, which aims to increase access to life-saving medicines and health supplies for the world’s most vulnerable women and children; 30 new and expanded commitments proposing actions towards the prevention and care of preterm birth were announced in May around the launch of the Born Too Soon report on preterm birth; in June, over 80 governments and a multitude of partners gathered at the Child Survival Call to Action to launch a sustained, global effort to save children’s lives; and at the London Family Planning Summit in July more than 150 partners announced commitments to ensure that an additional 120 million women and girls can access voluntary family planning by 2020. Further detailing the movement’s progress and implementation of commitments, the first annual review of the independent Expert Review Group will be presented to Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon during the week of the 2012 United Nations General Assembly meeting in New York.  This report will reinforce the movement’s remarkable progress, while also emphasizing that momentum needs to be sustained. This remarkable progress needs to be sustained to achieve the health MDGs and reach our global target to prevent the deaths of 16 million women and children, and improve the lives of millions more by 2015.

About UNICEF
UNICEF works in 190 countries and territories to help children survive and thrive, from early childhood through adolescence. The world’s largest provider of vaccines for developing countries, UNICEF supports child health and nutrition, good water and sanitation, quality basic education for all boys and girls, and the protection of children from violence, exploitation, and AIDS. UNICEF is funded entirely by the voluntary contributions of individuals, businesses, foundations and governments. For more information about UNICEF and its work visit: www.unicef.org

About UNFPA
UNFPA, the United Nations Population Fund, is an international development agency that delivers a world where every pregnancy is wanted, every childbirth is safe, and every young person’s potential is fulfilled. UNFPA works in partnership with more than 150 countries, especially in the area of reproductive health, including maternal health and family planning. For more than 30 years, UNFPA has been procuring contraceptives and life-saving commodities and medicines for developing countries and is today one of the largest public sector procurers of these items.

For further information, please contact:
Kathryn Donovan, UNICEF New York, Tel + 1 212 326 7452, kdonovan@unicef.org

Christian Moen, UNICEF New York, Tel + 212 326 7516, cmoen@unicef.org

Mandy Kibel, UNFPA New York, Tel + 1 212 297 5293, kibel@unfpa.org

Etienne Franca, UNFPA, New York, Tel + 1 917 310 8957, franca@unfpa.org