14 July 2017

American Academy of Pediatrics

2015

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), a US non -profit membership organization of 62,000 pediatricians dedicated to the health of all children, has a long-standing commitment to child survival. In 2011, the AAP Every Woman Every Child commitment was to deliver training and technical assistance and scale-up the Helping Babies Breathe® program. In 2014, AAP launched Helping Babies Survive, a suite of newborn survival curricula, to address preventable child deaths by strengthening the skills of birth attendants and caregivers throughout the newborn period. Through use of high quality evidence-based zero/low literacy innovative practical educational programs, Helping Babies Breathe® is joined by Essential Care for Every Baby and Essential Care for the Small Baby. The AAP is implementing Helping Babies Survive in collaboration with the Survive and Thrive Global Development Alliance: USAID, Save the Children, NICHD, Laerdal Global Health, Johnson and Johnson, and several others.

We renew our commitment to reach more than 60 countries and 1.5 million children, mothers and families in support of the Every Newborn Action Plan. Additionally, between 2015-2017, AAP commits to saving at least 100,000 newborns and, in partnership with the pediatric associations of India, Nigeria, and Ethiopia, to facilitating in-country ability to continue spreading and scaling-up Helping Babies Survive training initiatives.

Commitment Progress

Overall, the Helping 100,000 Babies Survive and Thrive (100KB) curriculum content adaptations, field testing, and master trainings in all three countries were conducted by the start of 2016. Program roll-outs continue throughout regions in each country.

India: The overarching plan focuses on 5 districts to implement a model for India to improve immediate newborn care while enhancing existing governmental improvement efforts and ensuring scale-up to the national level. Throughout 2015, in-country facilitators were trained using the adapted Helping Babies Survive (HBS) educational program and planning occurred for a national Master Training of the Trainers (MTOT) which occurred in early 2016 and included 25 national trainers from the 5 pilot districts (government staff, nurse midwives and obstetricians). To date, 15 facilities in each of 5 districts have implemented trainings and received an introduction to QI, with about 90% of the facilities having formed QI teams.

Ethiopia: The Ethiopia country plan aims to enhance newborn corners in 180 hospitals utilizing an adapted HBS curriculum. In-country partners supported by the GDA and including the Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH) facilitated a MTOT in 2015 for 36 participants (pediatricians, midwives, nurses, neonatologists, health officers); 20 individuals now serve as Ethiopian Master Trainers across 7 regions and 720 providers across the 180 hospitals have been trained. Regional cascade training and supportive supervision workshop are planned for 2017.

Nigeria: The Nigeria country plan covers 8 states supported by multiple partners and utilizes a blended curriculum of the Essential Newborn Care Corps national program and HBS materials, which was crafted by the end of 2015 and used for Master Trainings for 75 providers. Trainings scheduled for 2017 are slated to train 180 Master Trainers across six country zones, who will then train hospital providers within their respective states.

2014-Every Newborn Action Plan

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is a US-based not-for-profit membership organization of 62,000 pediatricians, and pediatric medical and surgical specialists. The AAP is dedicated to the health of all children, and has a long-standing commitment to child survival programs and to helping achieve the MDGs. The AAP commitment to Every Woman Every Child is through the delivery of training and technical assistance and through scale-up of the Helping Babies Breathe® (HBB) program. HBB is designed to ensure child survival and prevent birth asphyxia by strengthening the skills of birth attendants through use of a high quality evidence-based zero/low literacy practical educational program which teaches birth attendants in MDG countries how to care for newborns at birth. HBB focuses on the “Golden Minute®,” the first minute after birth, during which time most babies with asphyxia will respond to simple interventions, including stimulation and low-technology room-air resuscitation.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) commits, over the next three years, to reach more than 60 countries and more than 1.5 million children, their mothers, and families through the launch of the Helping Babies Survive suite of newborn survival related curricula. The Helping Babies Survive (HBS) curricula are designed to ensure child survival and address preventable child deaths by strengthening the skills of birth attendants and caregivers throughout the newborn period. Through the use of high quality evidence- based zero/low literacy practical educational programs, Helping Babies Breathe® (HBB) is joined by Essential Care for Every Baby (ECEB) and Essential Care for the Small Baby (ECSB), helping an additional 100,000 babies survive and thrive. The AAP developed and is implementing HBS in collaboration with Survive and Thrive Global Development Alliance partners: USAID, Save the Children, the National Institute for Child Health and Human Development, Laerdal Global Health, Johnson & Johnson, and numerous others, including the pediatric associations of India, Nigeria, and Ethiopia. The 2014 estimated contribution of this commitment is USD $35 million.

2011

The AAP will expand and enhance implementation of HBB in collaboration with its partners, USAID, Save the Children, the National Institute for Health and Human Development, and Laerdal Global Health. AAP’s efforts through HBB will reach more than 1 million children, their mothers, and families. The 2011 estimated contribution of this commitment is US $13 million.
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